Thursday, 08 December 2022

In view of the increasing shortage of skilled workers, women are an important target group when recruiting for many manufacturing and engineering companies. We spoke to Franziska Gempp (32), HR Manager, at the international automotive supplier ARaymond in Lörrach, Germany, and the trained technical draftswoman Yvonne Maschat (34) about how the specialist for fastening and assembly solutions is doing at its German locations Lörrach and Weil am Rhein, what support the company needs from politicians, what perspectives women have, and what makes a technical profession so exciting.

Ms. Gempp, how are you affected by the shortage of skilled workers and what kind of support would you like from education policy?

Franziska Gempp: The shortage of skilled workers is of particular concern to us in the area of ​​technical jobs. In many cases, we lack skilled workers here – such as a good electrician or a toolmaker. Against this background, the increasing academization worries us. For us, a good education is just as important as a good degree. We are currently noticing that a large number of young people immediately think in the direction of studying and that training is becoming less important. I wish that we would emphasize the value of our very good dual training system in Germany much more. One of our trainees told me that the career orientation at her high school was exclusively geared towards studying. I think schoolchildren should be aware that they can start an apprenticeship with a high school diploma and, based on that, develop further professionally. And they should be able to test whether they are more the type for scientific or practical work. For me, that would be important content that should be discussed in the career orientation phase.

What contribution does your company itself make to career orientation?

For example, we offer many internships, of course also for girls and young women. In view of the shortage of skilled workers, women are an important target group for us, as are career changers or somewhat older applicants. When it comes to women, I think the most important thing is to get them excited about technology at an early age. That's why we target girls at school and bring them into the company through campaigns such as Girls' Day or internships. We often get feedback like "Wow, I hadn't imagined it that way, that's really interesting." Or "I thought that was much more difficult." In addition to the exciting technique itself, this certainly has something to do with the fact that production conditions have changed significantly in recent years and the technical production jobs are no longer associated with heavy physical work. We have lifting aids, etc., so the jobs are suitable for everyone — men and women, but also older workers.

When the women are with you: How does, for example, a technical production job go together with the topic of children or caring for relatives — both topics in which women in particular continue to withdraw from their jobs?

We see to it that we get the best possible outcome for our employees and for us as an employer with flexible working time models – in other words, in production, for example, we talk about shift models that are suitable for childcare. In areas such as construction and development, mobile working is also possible for better compatibility. And then of course we have many part-time models, which are normal for us wherever they are feasible. We keep in touch during parental leave: Many employees come by regularly or, of course, are part of the team at events such as a Christmas party or a barbecue.

Ms. Maschat, as a trained technical draftswoman, you now work as a project manager assistant in the development of ARaymond. How did you get into this technical job?

Yvonne Maschat: I did my training as a technical draftswoman here at ARaymond (today that corresponds to the job profile of a technical product designer) and, with the support of the company, I went to evening classes to do further training to become a technical business administrator. As a result, I got my current job as a project manager assistant in construction. As a technical draftswoman, I was entrusted with developing fasteners for the automotive industry and deriving the drawings from them. As an assistant, I still design today, but I also do a lot of customer communication and know what customers want.

— Content provided by ARaymond

 

Published in NEWS

ARaymond, an international automotive leader in fastening and assembly solutions, has announced the acquisition of CGA Technologies, an Italian manufacturer of high performing thermal cooling plates. This step follows the acquisition in early October of Castello Italia S.p.A., a company specializing in plastic tube extrusion for pneumatic applications within transportation and specific industrial market segments.

These acquisitions are not just about broadening the ARaymond product offering, but about scaling up complete and tailor-made plug-and-play solutions. The goal is to design and deliver optimized thermal management systems within the mobility and selected industrial sectors.

“As a leader of fastening and assembly solutions for more than 155 years, we continuously strive to reinvent ourselves and stay ahead in the fast-moving markets that we operate in. The automotive industry is shifting to electric and autonomous vehicles, and we want to actively contribute to this extraordinary transition. To meet our customers' evolving demands, we have a clear vision that agility and time to market are critical and that our customers are expecting complete solutions. For all these reasons, the acquisitions of CGA Technologies and Castello Italia S.p.A, are an ideal fit.  

“With this expansion, we are building up our Network to create sustainability for the future. This includes putting the well-being of our collaborators and the protection of our environment at the forefront of our priorities for our future generations.  We want to provide a service and product offering of the highest quality, that meets both our customers and employees demands for long-term growth and sustainability,” said Antoine Raymond, ARaymond CEO.

— Press release courtesy of ARaymond

 

Published in NEWS

At first glance, a startup working to battle climate change through its series of high-tech plant canopies would seem to have little in common with a 155-year-old old global automotive fastener supplier. But in the case of France’s Urban Canopee and supplier ARaymond, the pair was able to find common ground.

Urban Canopee’s innovative solutions fight against the effects of climate change by deploying plant canopies over cities to help combat heat, restore urban biodiversity, fight against air pollution, and improve the quality of life for citizens. They also offer the world’s first range of plant-based urban furniture.

With the wind and other elements at play, finding adequate fastening solutions to achieve these goals can prove difficult. After the two companies first connected 2017, a partnership was put into motion for ARaymond to adapt its automotive fasteners to fit the needs of Urban Canopee. 

“A long phase of testing must take place for Urban Canopee to develop a perfect fixing and assembly solution that resists wind, weight, and is flexible enough to be folded for delivery and to fit different structures,” said Hubert Michaudet of Urban Canopee. “Through our work with ARaymond, we were able to find the solution to these fastening issues, and are excited to find a partner committed to using their engineering expertise to support our efforts to battle climate change.”

Published in TECHNOLOGY

While the world is becoming more equal in terms of gender equality in the workplace,  in many professions it’s still very one-sided in terms of representation.

One such profession is engineering. Studies show that currently only 13 percent of engineers are women. Thankfully, many companies are working to change that, including the ARaymond Network, which manufactures assembly and fastening systems worldwide and has more than 7,000 employees.

Mareike Pollichino is an engineer who works for ARaymond in Germany as a parts designer and development engineerfor metal fasteners used in the automotive industry. She has been with the company for more than 12 years.

Pollichino says her decision to pursuing this automotive engineering as a career was a delayed decision, because initially she viewed working in the automotive field as a male profession.

“I was always curious about how things worked and was interested in the subject. But I decided very late that I wanted a technical profession in automotive. Prior to that, I had thought of other roles like media design and graphic design being for women, and automotive for men,” Pollichino said. “Thankfully my family motivated me to pursue this, including my brother who is an engineer. Through encouragement from my internship in ARaymond, I was positively surprised how open the company was to me as a young woman. After my internship, I wanted to continue my career in this field.”

Published in NEWS

When one thinks of the agricultural industry, plastic waste is not the first thing that comes to mind. But the reality is that plastics play key roles in the farming and greenhouse business — and leave behind much waste every year.


As an example, just in the United States, the agricultural plastics generation is estimated to be 816 million pounds. And most of that is not recycled, ending up in the ground or landfills, often impacting wildlife and the environment negatively.

A positive trend, though, is the move toward more eco-friendly, biodegradable products — which are fully compostable and will leave behind no waste.

Published in NEWS

ROCHESTER HILLS, Mich. — Demand for solar photovoltaic (PV) systems is on the rise globally, in part due to the need to provide more electrical power at a lower cost and low CO2 emission.

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA) forecast for 2024, Renewable power capacity is set to expand by 50% between 2019 and 2024, led by solar PV that will alone account for almost 60% of the growth. Groud mount and rooftop PV installation is expected to grow from 630 GW to 1,500 GW globally by 2024.

One barrier to market growth is the high cost of panel installation. Standard mounting with typical nuts and bolts can stress the PV modules, leading to maintenance cost increases and durability concerns. Other challenges are:

  • Carrying heavy tools around during assembly
  • Installation time
  • Safety issues caused by climbing on top of modules as well as potential damage to panel
  • Loosening of panels requiring re-torque

ARaymond delivers solutions for solar

ARaymond’s panel clips simplify PV module assembly. They provide fast, easy installation in field operations, resulting in significant labor cost reduction compared to nuts and bolts.

The fastener installation requires no heavy tools and takes place underneath the system, eliminating the need to climb above the modules, reducing potential for employee injury and damage to the module. Clips have proven, long-term performance, and have been tested in both static and dynamic loading.

“With our clips, a customer in Australia recently set the world record for the fastest installation; a 130-Megawatt installation at 690 panels per person and per day (team of 3), with a slide and clip structure,” said Jean-Baptiste Chevrier, V.P. Sales & Marketing for ARaymond Energies.

Cable management is also a factor that may impact the overall installation and maintenance cost. Incorrect practices can lead to undesirable consequences, such as overheating.

Faulty PV wiring management practices are one of the leading technical failures encountered in PV projects, causing significant financial impact, sometimes more than 15 percent of the initial investment, according to Solar Bankability, a project funded by the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 program.

ARaymond’s dedicated selection of robust metal and plastic clips, cable straps and adaptors avoid mechanical stress and strain, excessive heat when bundled, and water intrusion when attaching cables over, or on the side of module edges or structure rails.

They ensure a long-term solar installation, and in turn reduce potential risk to PV project investment.

About ARaymond Energies

ARaymond Energies believes in the importance of renewable energies for our future and is committed to developing breakthrough technologies in order to make the assembly process easier, faster, cheaper. The headquarters of ARaymond Energies are in Grenoble, France, with sales offices around the globe. We take pride in being able to leverage the 150 years of expertise of the ARaymond Network to develop unique and meaningful solutions, while being able to produce them in large quantities and standardize them.

About ARaymond

With more than 7,000 employees in 25 countries around the world, the ARaymond Network designs, manufactures and markets assembly and fastening systems. Founded in 1865, this family business based in Grenoble, France, and inventor of the press stud, has always put human values at the heart of its success. ARaymond, based on the conviction that the wellbeing and empowerment of its collaborators is essential to its continued success.  Guided by innovation and value creation, the ARaymond Network is today one of the global leaders in fastening and assembly solutions for many market segments.

— Press release courtesy of ARaymond

Published in TECHNOLOGY

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